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Wednesday, July 10, 2013

Delight Your Customers


Sometimes it seems that no matter where you turn good customer service is  the exception rather than the rule ... even in commission structured transactions. Expediency and profit seem to be in the driver’s seat.

In his book “Delight Your Customers; 7 Simple Ways to Raise Your Customer Service from Ordinary to Extraordinary,” Steve Curtin suggests an underlying problem:
Most people, when asked, “What’s your job?” will list the duties and tasks associated with their position. When it all comes down to it, the  true essence of your job – your highest priority – is to create delighted customers who will be less price sensitive, have higher repurchase rates, and enthusiastically recommend the company or brand to others.

Curtin’s three truths of exceptional customer service are:
It reflects the essence of the employee's job role.
It is always voluntary - an employee chooses to deliver exceptional service.
It doesn't cost any more to deliver than bad customer service.

Some other points from Curtin include:
Employees who display “a sense of urgency inspire confidence in customers,” Curtin writes. The use phrases “absolutely” and “right away.”  page 44
Recommend comptetitors’ better deals. Curtin writes, “It demonstrates an attitude of abundance carried over to store management.”  page 84
Play your worker’s passions. Curtin writes, “A hardware store employee who’s [into] carpentry can apply enthusiasm when advising customers.”  page 96
Add jokes in “packaging and routine processes,” like Whole Foods wrapping fish in fake newspaper that reads: “Whole Foods Market Pleads Guilty to Seafood Discrimination.”  page 116


Want a copy of "Delight Your Customers"?
CLICK HERE to go to the
Delight Your Customers page on Amazon.
 
 
 
Source: Delight Your Customers; 7 Simple Ways to Raise Your Customer Service from Ordinary
to Extraordinary (Amacom) Steve Curtin; Bloomberg Businessweek 7/1-7/2013

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